Category Archives: Uncategorized

The Great Work Begins: EEBO-TCP in the wild

SAA2016 plenary round table Session organiser:         Jonathan Hope, Strathclyde University UK     jonathan.r.hope@strath.ac.uk     Objectives of the session The release of EEBO-TCP phase 1 on 1st January 2015 was a beginning, not an end. This round table will consider the work to be done to, and with, EEBO-TCP: curation, […]

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Visualizing the Big Names of Early Modern Science

Visualizing English Print is currently working with a new corpus of Big Name scientific texts. The corpus contains 329 texts by 100 authors, drawn from EEBO-TCP and covering the period 1530-1724. These Big Name authors were selected on the basis of their prominence as early modern writers who address scientific subjects. The process of selecting […]

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Data and Metadata

(Post by Jonathan Hope and Beth Ralston; data preparation by Beth Ralston.) It is all about the metadata. That and text processing. Currently (July 2015) Visualising English Print (Strathclyde branch) is focussed on producing a hand-curated list of all ‘drama’ texts up to 1700, along with checked, clean metadata. Meanwhile VEP (Wisconsin branch) works on […]

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‘the size of it all carries us along’ – a new kind of literary history?

HCAS SYMPOSIUM: BIG DATA APPROACHES TO INTELLECTUAL AND LINGUISTIC HISTORY 1–2 DECEMBER 2014 Helsinki      http://www.helsinki.fi/collegium/events/big-data/ references and links for a presentation by Jonathan Hope pdf of slides Hope Helsinki 2014 title ‘the size of it all carries us along’ This Heat, ‘A New Kind of Water’, from Deceit (1981, Rough Trade) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NLMoDU9Tl_E   part […]

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The Novel and Moral Philosophy 2: Telling and Feeling, Aunts and Letters

Before I begin commenting on what I see in Serendip’s findings, I think it is worth providing some general information about the work from which the screen shot below is taken. The author, Charlotte Lennox (1730-1804), is most known for her novel The Female Quixote (1752), a picaresque about a romance addict who perpetually confuses […]

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